Playing “Tag” With Sharks


We heard late last night from the OWOO crew, which is currently filming and diving on location in the Bahamas as part of Expedition Tiger Shark in partnership with the folks at Summit Series, The Nature Conservancy and the Waitt Institute, without which the trip wouldn’t be possible.  (Read more here).

Despite limited connectivity on the boat, we received some cool photos of the team’s activities over the past few days, which have been focused on one thing – shark tagging. In successfully tagging a variety of sharks native to the Bahamas – tiger sharks and hammerheads, among others –researchers at The Nature Conservancy and The University of Miami’s R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program, hope to learn more about their behavior. The more we know about their behavior, the better equipped we are to help protect them. Knowledge is protection, in this case! 

Enjoy these photos and stay tuned for more updates from Expedition Tiger Shark.

OWOO crew member Peter Kragh underwater with the RED Epic camera looking for the perfect shot

Expedition Tiger Shark attempts to tag a research subject

Up-close shot of satellite tracking device on shark fin

The team discusses best locations for finding sharks

Virginia from the University of Miami team paints the shark tracking devices

Successful tagging of a hammerhead shark

OWOO crew member Marc Ostrick gets caught in a downpour

Team Expedition Tiger Shark tries to stay dry

 

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