The Weekly Dive Vol. 71


Dive into the latest edition of The Weekly Dive, where we bring you the big ocean news!
 




Farmed fish production overtakes beef for first time ever. Production of farmed fish has been skyrocketing. In 2012, it reached 66 million tons worldwide. Beef production that year hit 63 million tons. This raises the importance of making aquaculture, which can be very damaging if done incorrectly, more sustainable. [The Huffington Post]


Chagos marine reserve upheld by court, despite keeping out islanders. In part of a long legal battle, islanders evicted from the Chagos archipelago in the 1960s argued the marine reserve created in 2010 prevents them from returning to the islands because fishing was their livelihood. However, the High Court of England ruled the reserve was legal. [BBC; Academia.edu]


World population could reach 11 billion by 2100. New projections suggest population growth will proceed faster than previously predicted, largely due to higher-than-expected birthrates in Africa. [The Huffington Post]


Curbing deforestation is most important action to help coral reefs. New research found that soil erosion and sediment runoff due to deforestation threaten coral reefs even more than climate change. Improved land use policies would buy time for reefs facing other threats. [Science Daily]

 
Investing in clean beaches pays off. A study on Southern California beach use found that where municipalities had installed storm drain diversion systems, beach attendance significantly increased. [Science Daily]


Hot spots for shipping accidents, an environmental hazard, identified. A study found that the majority of accidents occur in the South China Sea, the North Sea, and the Mediterranean, putting ecologically important areas at risk. [BBC]
 

Photos via Wikimedia Commons by: 
Richard Dorrell, Creative Commons License; Alex Proimos, Creative Commons License;  Przykuta, Creative Commons License; Rvongher, Creative Commons License; jimmyweee, Creative Commons License; NASA, Public Domain. 

 

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