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Sea Creature Fun Fact: Thick-Billed Murre

The thick-billed murre might look like a penguin because of its black and white colors, but it’s actually not. -- It is an Arctic sea bird that swims far better than it flies. -- It uses its stubby wings to “fly” through the water and it is among the deepest divers of all birds, easily going to 330 feet to feed on fish, squid, and crustaceans. -- The thick-billed murre doesn’t build nests. Instead, the female joins others of her species in a large, noisy colony and lays a single egg on a narrow cliff ledge. She then arranges pebbles and other debris close to the egg to keep it from falling into the ocean.

For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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Sea Creature Fun Facts: Ringed Seal

Ringed seals are a marine mammals. They are the smallest species of seal on Earth. -- They can be found in the polar region of the northern hemisphere. -- Ringed seals use their claws to make holes in the ice so that they can come up to breathe, but these holes are favorite places for polar bears to sit in wait for a meal. To check if there is a bear waiting for them, sometimes they blow bubbles up the breathing hole before surfacing. -- They can dive 300 feet down and hold their breath for 45 minutes, but they usually feed between just 40 - 100 feet deep. -- Adults are dark grey with lighter marks shaped like rings on their backs – that’s why they’re called ringed seals. Babies don’t have rings yet, though. They are white and fluffy for camouflage on snow while they are still learning how to get around.


For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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Sea Creature Fun Facts: Polar Bears

The polar bear is a marine mammal. Its scientific name is Ursus maritimus, which means “sea bear.” -- Polar Bears can eat almost anything –  ringed seals, bearded seal, walrus, reindeer, and even whales. -- They can be found in 5 different countries - Greenland, Norway, Canada, Russia, and USA. -- They can typically be found along or near coasts and islands and on floating ice.

For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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Sea Creature Fun Facts: Narwhal

The narwhal is a medium-size toothed whale. -- The narwhal only has two teeth, and one of them can grow into a long tusk. Scientists aren’t sure yet what they use it for. -- Not all females grow tusks, but all males do and some of them even get to 9 feet long! Some people think that this spiral tusk is the source of the myth of the unicorn.

For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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Sea Creature Fun Facts: King Eider Duck

The King Eider sea duck is a bird that lives in the Arctic. -- They often dive deep to the ocean floor to  eat mollusks and crustaceans. -- The male King Eider is a strikingly beautiful bird, with feathers of black, white, gray, and green, and its beak is orange with an unusual knobby shape. -- Female King Eiders are mostly chestnut brown. -- There is an old legend that says the King Eider is simply a Common Eider whose age and experience have earned it the right to wear a “crown” but we know now that they are actually different species.

For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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Sea Creature Fun Facts: Beluga Whale

Belugas are white whales that migrate within the region of the Arctic Ocean. --In the summer they migrate north and in the winter they migrate south away from the north pole to avoid getting trapped by forming ice. --Beluga calves are born dark gray and become darker after the first month. Thereafter they gradually become paler and as adults they are completely white.

 

For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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To the Arctic: Polar Bears Rough and Tumble

Polar bears are the newest of the 6 bear species alive today, arising about 150,000 years ago, when grizzly bears living in Siberia and Alaska began venturing farther out onto sea ice to take advantage of easy seal hunting. The good ones stayed out there, and gradually became separated from grizzlies who remained terrestrial omnivores, that largely lived on plants, and were best suited to temperate climates. Over generations the seal-hunting bears adapted to being on the ice, and a new type of bear emerged: Ursus maritimus, a marine mammal and pure carnivore, the polar bear.

For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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To the Arctic: Polar Bears Up Close

Polar bears are the newest of the 6 bear species alive today, arising about 150,000 years ago, when grizzly bears living in Siberia and Alaska began venturing farther out onto sea ice to take advantage of easy seal hunting. The good ones stayed out there, and gradually became separated from grizzlies who remained terrestrial omnivores, that largely lived on plants, and were best suited to temperate climates. Over generations the seal-hunting bears adapted to being on the ice, and a new type of bear emerged: Ursus maritimus, a marine mammal and pure carnivore, the polar bear.

For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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To the Arctic: Polar Bear Mother and Cubs

The mother teaches her cubs about survival—catching seals, avoiding hungry male polar bears, using their incredibly powerful sense of smell. The mother bear will nurse them for a year and train them for 2 years before they’re out on their own.

For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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