Gallery

To the Arctic: Melting Ice in the Arcitc

20,000-25,000 polar bears live in the coastal and offshore zones of Canada, Alaska, Russia, Greenland and Norway. Their habitat is disappearing. Climate change is effecting the Arctic faster than anywhere on the planet, and the polar bear, like the canary in the coal mine, is a living signal of the harmful changes in the environment.

For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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In the Company of Dragons

Fourteen inches long with bright red eyes, the leafy sea dragon moves gently, matching perfectly the rhythm of waving algal fronds.

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To the Arctic: Filmmakers at Work in the Arctic

We didn’t just make an IMAX film about the Arctic, we took you there. You'll feel the cold as you come face to face with polar bears, walrus, seals and other wildlife. Whether diving under the sea ice, mounting cameras to airplanes and dogsleds, or just staying up all night to get the shot, we did it.

For more information about polar bears and Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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Diving with the World’s Largest Cuttlefish

"We spent three days in Whyalla and this gave me plenty of time to capture the lifecycle of the giant cuttlefish. It was great to see so many animals on the spawning grounds. Australia has outlawed fishing for the giant cuttlefish during spawning seasons. Before the law was passed, these giants were rapidly disappearing from the Gulf. Now they seem to be back in healthy numbers and every year more gather in the northern Spencer Gulf." -- Howard Hall on Diving with Cuttlefish

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Dancing with Australia’s Great Whites

"Under normal circumstances I’d be fascinated by a stingray that was more than six feet in diameter, especially when they are followed by a school of silver jacks. But we are not here to see stingrays. We are here to see great white sharks." -- Howard Hall on diving with Great White Sharks

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To the Arctic: Diving Under the Arctic

Arctic underwater cinematographer Adam Ravetch witnesses the beauty and danger of diving in the frigid Arctic Ocean, as he does in the IMAX 3D film, TO THE ARCTIC

For more information on Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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To the Arctic: Polar Bear Adaptaions

Polar bears are the newest of the 6 bear species alive today, arising about 150,000 years ago, when grizzly bears living in Siberia and Alaska began venturing farther out onto sea ice to take advantage of easy seal hunting. The good ones stayed out there, and gradually became separated from grizzlies who remained terrestrial omnivores, that largely lived on plants, and were best suited to temperate climates. Over generations the seal-hunting bears adapted to being on the ice, and a new type of bear emerged: Ursus maritimus, a marine mammal and pure carnivore, the polar bear.

For more information on Arctic wildlife, see the new IMAX® film "To The Arctic 3D" opening in select IMAX Theatres starting April 20, 2012. "To The Arctic 3D" is a MacGillivray Freeman Film from Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Corporation.

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Mission Aquarius: Sylvia Earle

From 60ft beneath the sea, Dr. Sylvia Earle sends a wake up call about the plight of our ocean and why mankind needs it to survive. This is Aquarius' last scheduled mission after 20 years as a research base for studying coral reefs, sea life and the health of the ocean.

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Mission Aquarius: Neemo16

The ocean floor is the best place on earth to train for space. NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) and has sent 16 missions to Aquarius since 2001, and led to invaluable astronaut learning and training. Being weightless and saturated changes the mind set. The aquanauts know they can't surface -- they might as well be on the moon. The June 2012 mission shown here focused on exploring asteroids, and may be the last NASA trip to the underwater space base.

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Mission Aquarius: The Habitat

Training for living on the ocean floor is over and it is time to move into Aquarius Reef Base - the last underwater habitat in the world. Take the first tour of the mission as the Aquanauts get settled and adjust to their new home for seven days.

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